Funded Research Trip to the Historical Archives of the European Union, Florence

UACES is pleased to announce a new funding initiative for its Student and Early-Career members (if you are not yet a member, you can join here).

Following on from the success of our anniversary year, we are delighted to offer a scholarship for a PhD student or Early-Career researcher to visit the Historical Archives of the European Union (HAEU) in Florence for 5-10 working days and conduct archival research (of the applicant's choice).

To be eligible to apply, your research must be in European Studies or a related field (e.g. Politics, IR, Law, History, Sociology, Economics, Cultural Studies).

The successful applicant will be expected to submit a paper or panel proposal based on the research that they conduct at the archives for the UACES Annual Conference taking place in 2020 (the call for papers will open in October 2019).

Generous funding of £1300 is on offer for the successful applicant. £1000 is to cover travel, accommodation and subsistence whilst in Florence, £300 is to cover costs for attending the UACES annual conference in 2020 (location to be announced imminently).

The research trip can take place in Spring or Summer 2019. It is envisaged that it will last between 5-10 working days maximum. Final details can be agreed between UACES, the EUI and the researcher following a successful application.

Submit your Application

In order to apply for funding, email admin [at] uaces.org with your CV and a covering letter outlining:

  1. The area you are currently researching
  2. In which holdings of the HAEU you are particularly interested
  3. How a visit to the HAEU could benefit your resarch

If you have any queries about the funding please contact (admin [at] uaces.org).

The deadline for applications is Sunday 31 December 2018.

LISTEN NOW

'Using Archives for Historical Research on the EU' - N. Pieres Ludlow (London School of Economics and Political Science)

Find out more about how archival work could aid your research on contemporary Europe (NB: if you jump ahead, the audio may take some moments to load):

This talk was recorded at the 'Europe in the Archives, Europe in the Future' conference (Florence, 12 October 2017). Download audio to listen later.

Previous Scholarship Winners

Congratulations to our two successful applicants for 2018:

Cleo Davies (University of Edinburgh)

"After working for five years in European affairs in Brussels, I am doing a PhD in Politics at the University of Edinburgh on the creation of the European Supervisory Authorities post Global Financial Crisis. The research includes a longitudinal study of the European Commission’s thinking about integrated financial market supervision. Through the angle of supervision, I explore the tension between the creation of a Single Market and an Economic and Monetary Union. The visit to the HAEU is more specifically about gathering data on the possible tensions between the UK and the EU in the area of financial market integration, focusing on aspects of banking supervision and regulation from the mid-1980s."

Marta Musso (King's College London)

"I am a historian working on European, global, and digital history. I study the relations between economic actor, States, and international diplomacy, as well as new methods of historical research and heritage preservation in a digital environment. I hold a PhD from the University of Cambridge and in 2016/2017 I was Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute. I am currently Teaching Fellow in Digital Humanities at King’s College London and the Communication Manager of the Archives Portal Europe Foundation. This research trip to the Archives of the European Union will help me to complete the research for my first book on the nationalisation of the oil industry and European Energy policies. I will digitise the fond on the EEC activities related to non-nuclear energy and analyse it through automated text analysis; a new methodology that will help me to understand the discussions on energy policies occurred at a European level between the 1950s and 1970s."